The Heritage Run Tourism Association P.O. Box 757 · Marystown, NL Canada · A0E 2M0 Tel: 709) 279-1887 ·Fax: (709) 279-5116 Email:theheritagerun@nf.aibn.com 
Newfoundland & Labrador’s Burin Peninsula
Captain Clarke Drive Captain Clarke Drive heads southwest at Epworth continuing on route 220. This journey is opened up to centuries of marine and international heritage. Museums, monuments and displays preserve and uphold the satisfying and breathtaking stories of the region. Captain Clarke Drive is named for the 16th century English mariner, explorer and privateer Richard Clarke. As navigator, he sailed with Sir Humphrey Gilbert on the 1583 voyage to Newfoundland, where Gilbert's vessel Delight was wrecked, claiming the captain's life. Clarke and 14 crew managed to sail the ship's boat with one oar, landing at Little St. Lawrence after a week at sea. You can visit "Dig a Little Deeper" rest stop atop of Beaver Pond hill just before entering Little St. Lawrence. Shaped by vigor and hard conditions, the character of St. Lawrence has shown kindness and unselfishness in hard times.  St. Lawrence has amazing tales of heroism and survival. The hiking trails and nearby beaches are extensive and include the heritage walk to Calapouse Head, and the nature hike to Middle Point Lighthouse. Nature has performed a miracle with the Umbrella Tree at scenic Herring Cove. Visiting St. Lawrence becomes even more moving and momentous in light of the shipwrecks at Chamber Cove and Lawn Point. Two American vessels, the USS Truxtun and the USS Pollux ran aground in a storm on route to the US naval base at Argentia on February 8, 1942. One hundred and eighty six servicemen were rescued and cared for in local homes until they made a full recovery. The stories of these legendary shipwrecks can be relived at both the Miners' Museum and at the U.S. Memorial Health Centre. A tribute to these brave servicemen and this event bears the name "The Echoes of Valour Monument". It stands proud at the front of the Town Hall. St. Lawrence is also the site of North America's largest fluorspar deposit and is a prospector's paradise. The Miners' Museum tells another heart warming story of the St. Lawrence miners who ventured underground to mine fluorspar. It's a tale of danger and tragedy of deadly dust and gas and of the men and families who endured. St. Lawrence is also known as the "Soccer Capital of Canada". The rivalries between the Laurentians and other communities around the peninsula are unique. This soccer team has kicked their way to more national championships than any other community of its size in Canada. Admire the coastal drive as you head to Lawn, but take note of the Wind Mill energy that is being harnessed along the shoreline! Lawn, as other communities can attest along this coastline, has experienced the extremes of the sea environment.  Due to Lawn's involvement in the inshore cod, bank salmon, capelin, lobster, herring, and seal fisheries it has become one of the better harbours. Lawn offers much for visitors such as a hike to the abandoned communities of Webber, & Roundabout or to find out more history of Lawn make a visit to the Lawn Heritage Museum. Captain Clarke Drive leads you through the most Atlantic of the Heritage Run's communities. These settlements are located on the barrens facing the Grand Banks. They are subject to waves that roll in over the vast stretch of beaches. Communities of Lord's Cove a site of ongoing Wave Energy research, Taylor's Bay, Point au Gaul, Lamaline, and Point May are directly bound to the fishery. Middle Lawn Island is home to the first known colony of the Manx Shearwater in North America. This whole barren landscape is well known for it's bountiful marshberries and bakeapple berries. One of the oldest communities in the area is Lamaline, which was settled in the late 1700's. This area is known for the dangerous game of smuggling liquor from St. Pierre. On Allan's Island just before the lighthouse, there stands a Statue of the Virgin Mary seemingly watching over all those at sea. Smuggling everything from bait to booze was a way many fishermen supplemented their earnings. Smuggled goods from St. Pierre supplied the entire coast with liquor, tobacco, sugar and tea. All accelerated when the American Congress passed the Vostead Act in 1919 prohibiting American sale & manufacture of alcoholic drink. Rum running to the US became St. Pierre & Miquelon's prime industry. Chicago crime boss Al Capone was a frequent visitor to these shores until 1933 when Congress passed the 21st Amendment. The humble Lamaline Heritage House has an outdoor Interpretive Tsunami story site dedicated to the lives, homes, and livelihoods lost during the 1929 Tidal Wave. On November 18th that year around 5:00 supper time a big tremor shook this whole area. At 7:00 the water came rolling in, one big wave 50 feet high. Communities from Lamaline to Rock Harbour were worst hit. 27 lives were lost when houses, stores and boats were all washed out to sea. It was the worst earthquake disaster in Canadian history. Read personal accounts at Tsunami sites along this coast.  The Grand Banks is no stranger to other tragedies. The April 14th, 1912 sinking of the Titanic, after it struck an iceberg claiming the lives of more than 1500 of it's 2250 passengers, was just off these famous banks. Point May is your last stop on Captain Clark Drive. It is the closest point of land to the French Island of St. Pierre et Miquelon and another great location for storm watching. Visit the Point Crewe Heritage Park which offers a spyscope view of St. Pierre.
©2016 Heritage Run Tourism Association · All Rights Reserved
Newfoundland & Labrador’s Burin Peninsula
Captain Clarke Drive Captain Clarke Drive heads southwest at Epworth continuing on route 220. This journey is opened up to centuries of marine and international heritage. Museums, monuments and displays preserve and uphold the satisfying and breathtaking stories of the region. Captain Clarke Drive is named for the 16th century English mariner, explorer and privateer Richard Clarke. As navigator, he sailed with Sir Humphrey Gilbert on the 1583 voyage to Newfoundland, where Gilbert's vessel Delight was wrecked, claiming the captain's life. Clarke and 14 crew managed to sail the ship's boat with one oar, landing at Little St. Lawrence after a week at sea. You can visit "Dig a Little Deeper" rest stop atop of Beaver Pond hill just before entering Little St. Lawrence. Shaped by vigor and hard conditions, the character of St. Lawrence has shown kindness and unselfishness in hard times.  St. Lawrence has amazing tales of heroism and survival. The hiking trails and nearby beaches are extensive and include the heritage walk to Calapouse Head, and the nature hike to Middle Point Lighthouse. Nature has performed a miracle with the Umbrella Tree at scenic Herring Cove. Visiting St. Lawrence becomes even more moving and momentous in light of the shipwrecks at Chamber Cove and Lawn Point. Two American vessels, the USS Truxtun and the USS Pollux ran aground in a storm on route to the US naval base at Argentia on February 8, 1942. One hundred and eighty six servicemen were rescued and cared for in local homes until they made a full recovery. The stories of these legendary shipwrecks can be relived at both the Miners' Museum and at the U.S. Memorial Health Centre. A tribute to these brave servicemen and this event bears the name "The Echoes of Valour Monument". It stands proud at the front of the Town Hall. St. Lawrence is also the site of North America's largest fluorspar deposit and is a prospector's paradise. The Miners' Museum tells another heart warming story of the St. Lawrence miners who ventured underground to mine fluorspar. It's a tale of danger and tragedy of deadly dust and gas and of the men and families who endured. St. Lawrence is also known as the "Soccer Capital of Canada". The rivalries between the Laurentians and other communities around the peninsula are unique. This soccer team has kicked their way to more national championships than any other community of its size in Canada. Admire the coastal drive as you head to Lawn, but take note of the Wind Mill energy that is being harnessed along the shoreline! Lawn, as other communities can attest along this coastline, has experienced the extremes of the sea environment.  Due to Lawn's involvement in the inshore cod, bank salmon, capelin, lobster, herring, and seal fisheries it has become one of the better harbours. Lawn offers much for visitors such as a hike to the abandoned communities of Webber, & Roundabout or to find out more history of Lawn make a visit to the Lawn Heritage Museum. Captain Clarke Drive leads you through the most Atlantic of the Heritage Run's communities. These settlements are located on the barrens facing the Grand Banks. They are subject to waves that roll in over the vast stretch of beaches. Communities of Lord's Cove a site of ongoing Wave Energy research, Taylor's Bay, Point au Gaul, Lamaline, and Point May are directly bound to the fishery. Middle Lawn Island is home to the first known colony of the Manx Shearwater in North America. This whole barren landscape is well known for it's bountiful marshberries and bakeapple berries. One of the oldest communities in the area is Lamaline, which was settled in the late 1700's. This area is known for the dangerous game of smuggling liquor from St. Pierre. On Allan's Island just before the lighthouse, there stands a Statue of the Virgin Mary seemingly watching over all those at sea. Smuggling everything from bait to booze was a way many fishermen supplemented their earnings. Smuggled goods from St. Pierre supplied the entire coast with liquor, tobacco, sugar and tea. All accelerated when the American Congress passed the Vostead Act in 1919 prohibiting American sale & manufacture of alcoholic drink. Rum running to the US became St. Pierre & Miquelon's prime industry. Chicago crime boss Al Capone was a frequent visitor to these shores until 1933 when Congress passed the 21st Amendment. The humble Lamaline Heritage House has an outdoor Interpretive Tsunami story site dedicated to the lives, homes, and livelihoods lost during the 1929 Tidal Wave. On November 18th that year around 5:00 supper time a big tremor shook this whole area. At 7:00 the water came rolling in, one big wave 50 feet high. Communities from Lamaline to Rock Harbour were worst hit. 27 lives were lost when houses, stores and boats were all washed out to sea. It was the worst earthquake disaster in Canadian history. Read personal accounts at Tsunami sites along this coast.  The Grand Banks is no stranger to other tragedies. The April 14th, 1912 sinking of the Titanic, after it struck an iceberg claiming the lives of more than 1500 of it's 2250 passengers, was just off these famous banks. Point May is your last stop on Captain Clark Drive. It is the closest point of land to the French Island of St. Pierre et Miquelon and another great location for storm watching. Visit the Point Crewe Heritage Park which offers a spyscope view of St. Pierre.
©2016 Heritage Run Tourism Association · All Rights Reserved