The Heritage Run Tourism Association P.O. Box 757 · Marystown, NL Canada · A0E 2M0 Tel: 709) 279-1887 ·Fax: (709) 279-5116 Email:theheritagerun@nf.aibn.com 
Newfoundland & Labrador’s Burin Peninsula
French Island Drive THE FRENCH ISLAND DRIVE leads you through the Burin Peninsula's western horizon from Point May northeast to Garnish on Route 220, and then back around to link in with Mariner Drive. Due to its longstanding association with the richest fishing grounds in the world, this land holds an important place in the province's history. The vastness of sea, land and azure sky is inspiring as the French islands of St. Pierre et Miquelon sit  mystically on the horizon. Fortune, from the Portugese "fortuna" meaning a place of good fortune, was built on the shore of a sand bar, or "barasway," along an inlet forming the harbour and extending inland for approximately 8 km (5 mi). Located in a shallow valley, the town is surrounded on the eastern and southwestern sides by low rolling hills, rich in geological history. The Fortune Head Ecological Reserve is globally recognized as the best place to mark the evolutionary change from Precambrian to Cambrian period. Earth science history and cultural history are found at Fortune Head Geology Centre, and the George & Mary Lake House respectively. Find the Fortune Sheds at the nearby Marina and visit the All Saints Anglican church which has the first stained glass window crafted in Newfoundland.  St. Pierre et Miquelon is only a short distance from Fortune by ferry. These islands, to the southwest, are France's last outpost in North America, and are a fast path to experience the character of continental Europe. The rhythms of Saint Pierre are similar to their French homeland. Here residents rise early to buy freshly baked bread, enjoy a comfortable afternoon siesta and later dine in a rich culture of French wine & cuisine. Travel Documents are required. Canadians must carry an official government issued photo ID or passport. European community visitors must have a valid passport. Other nationalities require a valid passport and may need a visa, depending upon the nationality. Children must have their own passport or ID card or be registered under their parents' passport. For information phone Immigration SPM (508) 41-1555. Grand Bank, is yet another culturally and traditionally significant community. The town's name has often been attributed to the bank fishery south of the peninsula, but in fact it refers to a high bank extending from Admiral's Cove to the harbour at water's edge. Grand Bank Brook forms a small harbour where it empties into the bay and the valley is sheltered by four hills. The Grand Bank lighthouse remains an important town icon. The past has not yet been lost on Grand Bank. It's Victorian structure and architecture are from the Bank Schooner days. The tapered twisting streets are suggestive of communities in Nova Scotia and the New England states, where the merchants and captains did business. The famous Grand Bank's schooner fishery was started when Samuel Harris built the first of the lustrous, prevailing vessels in 1881. The Harris House, which is a Queen Anne style manor with a "widow's walk" on the roof, is an admired heritage home. The Southern Newfoundland Seamen's Museum is a landmark attraction. Initially the Yugoslav Pavilion at Expo `67, this distinctive sail shaped building is home to many full scale exhibits including dories, engines, propellers and anchors. The artwork, maps and interpretive displays supply important keys to understanding and appreciating the Grand Bank's fishery. Molliers, which had once been a small fishing village, has now become a popular area for cabins and camping. Grand Beach is a community that was named for its long beach. Have a look at it's root cellar.  Frenchman's Cove has a popular provincial park and the Grande Meadows Golf Course. This 9 hole course is complemented by a unique seaside location and a long golf season. Enjoy beach combing on it's miles of beaches! The community of Garnish has deep roots to the inshore fishery. There's a century old lighthouse to explore, and hiking along the beach or on Long Ridge Hiking Trail. The Point Rosie ATV/Hiking Trail to the deserted community of Point Rosie covers an incredible 25 km of coastline.
©2016 Heritage Run Tourism Association · All Rights Reserved
Newfoundland & Labrador’s Burin Peninsula
French Island Drive THE FRENCH ISLAND DRIVE leads you through the Burin Peninsula's western horizon from Point May northeast to Garnish on Route 220, and then back around to link in with Mariner Drive. Due to its longstanding association with the richest fishing grounds in the world, this land holds an important place in the province's history. The vastness of sea, land and azure sky is inspiring as the French islands of St. Pierre et Miquelon sit  mystically on the horizon. Fortune, from the Portugese "fortuna" meaning a place of good fortune, was built on the shore of a sand bar, or "barasway," along an inlet forming the harbour and extending inland for approximately 8 km (5 mi). Located in a shallow valley, the town is surrounded on the eastern and southwestern sides by low rolling hills, rich in geological history. The Fortune Head Ecological Reserve is globally recognized as the best place to mark the evolutionary change from Precambrian to Cambrian period. Earth science history and cultural history are found at Fortune Head Geology Centre, and the George & Mary Lake House respectively. Find the Fortune Sheds at the nearby Marina and visit the All Saints Anglican church which has the first stained glass window crafted in Newfoundland.  St. Pierre et Miquelon is only a short distance from Fortune by ferry. These islands, to the southwest, are France's last outpost in North America, and are a fast path to experience the character of continental Europe. The rhythms of Saint Pierre are similar to their French homeland. Here residents rise early to buy freshly baked bread, enjoy a comfortable afternoon siesta and later dine in a rich culture of French wine & cuisine. Travel Documents are required. Canadians must carry an official government issued photo ID or passport. European community visitors must have a valid passport. Other nationalities require a valid passport and may need a visa, depending upon the nationality. Children must have their own passport or ID card or be registered under their parents' passport. For information phone Immigration SPM (508) 41-1555. Grand Bank, is yet another culturally and traditionally significant community. The town's name has often been attributed to the bank fishery south of the peninsula, but in fact it refers to a high bank extending from Admiral's Cove to the harbour at water's edge. Grand Bank Brook forms a small harbour where it empties into the bay and the valley is sheltered by four hills. The Grand Bank lighthouse remains an important town icon. The past has not yet been lost on Grand Bank. It's Victorian structure and architecture are from the Bank Schooner days. The tapered twisting streets are suggestive of communities in Nova Scotia and the New England states, where the merchants and captains did business. The famous Grand Bank's schooner fishery was started when Samuel Harris built the first of the lustrous, prevailing vessels in 1881. The Harris House, which is a Queen Anne style manor with a "widow's walk" on the roof, is an admired heritage home. The Southern Newfoundland Seamen's Museum is a landmark attraction. Initially the Yugoslav Pavilion at Expo `67, this distinctive sail shaped building is home to many full scale exhibits including dories, engines, propellers and anchors. The artwork, maps and interpretive displays supply important keys to understanding and appreciating the Grand Bank's fishery. Molliers, which had once been a small fishing village, has now become a popular area for cabins and camping. Grand Beach is a community that was named for its long beach. Have a look at it's root cellar.  Frenchman's Cove has a popular provincial park and the Grande Meadows Golf Course. This 9 hole course is complemented by a unique seaside location and a long golf season. Enjoy beach combing on it's miles of beaches! The community of Garnish has deep roots to the inshore fishery. There's a century old lighthouse to explore, and hiking along the beach or on Long Ridge Hiking Trail. The Point Rosie ATV/Hiking Trail to the deserted community of Point Rosie covers an incredible 25 km of coastline.
©2016 Heritage Run Tourism Association · All Rights Reserved