The Heritage Run Tourism Association P.O. Box 757 · Marystown, NL Canada · A0E 2M0 Tel: 709) 279-1887 ·Fax: (709) 279-5116 Email:theheritagerun@nf.aibn.com 
Newfoundland & Labrador’s Burin Peninsula
©2016 Heritage Run Tourism Association · All Rights Reserved
Mariner Drive The Gateway to the Heritage Run is Mariner Drive on route 210 next to Goobies Visitor Information centre at the intersection of the Trans Canada Highway. Marina Drive leads you south through the Burin Peninsula over the middle of panoramic Southeastern Barrens between Fortune and Placentia Bays. Barrens now cover much of this glacier shaped landscape which years ago was forested. Repeated wild fires, over-cutting, thin soil and strong winds discouraged reforestation. A new mix of life appeared. Carpets of heath moss mixed with lichens and low growing shrubs, blueberries, partridgeberries, crowberries, bakeapples, orchids and insect eating plants called pitcher plants cover the landscape. Wildlife such as migrating woodland caribou, ptarmigan, eagles, osprey, Canada Geese and in more recent years moose, all rely on the barrens for their food supply. Around you are giant strewn about boulders, called erratics, that were left behind by melting glaciers more than 10,000 years ago. Pleasant settlements of North Harbour and Garden Cove are short drives northwest of Placentia Bay.  Swift Current and Piper's Hole River area, are perennial favorites for anglers and vacationers. Climb Bear's Folly or hike the old railway line. If the breeze is right, you might hear the sound of the French Army Piper's ghost, his spirit playing to the wind. Another Placentia Bay side route takes you to the quiet communities of Davis Cove and Monkstown.  The Paradise River flows to the sea at the long, narrow inlet of Paradise Sound. The difficult to access hydroelectric dam is one of only three arched dams in North America. "Feeling Erratic" Interpretive Viewpark is a rest stop 50 kms further on route 210, near Sandy Harbour River. Route 211, on the rugged Fortune Bay side, leads to the fishing communities of Terrenceville, Grand Le Pierre and English Harbour East. In May and June, the Middle Ridge Caribou herd passes nearby on their migration south. The rugged hills stand in sharp contrast to the barrens, with scenic waterfalls and imposing views. Bald eagles are often sighted in these parts. Returning to route 210 and then off onto Route 212 leads you to other quaint Fortune Bay communities. The road to Jacques Fontaine winds throughout wooded mountains by a long pond that follows the road. St. Bernard's was once known as Fox Cove. Bay L'Argent is a port of call to the last remaining Fortune Bay coastal boat, traveling to Rencontre East and Pool's Cove. The same route continues to the fishing communities of Little Bay East, Little Harbour East and dramatic scenery of Harbour Mille. The Ragged Point Lighthouse at Little Bay East is a challenging walk. You can easily stroll to the sea stack at Little Harbour Beach. Placentia Bay is home to numerous islands, nearly 365 in total, many once settled. Newfoundland resettlement represents one of the largest government sponsored population movements in Canadian history. Between 1954 and 1975 more than 300 settlements were abandoned with nearly 30,000 people relocated. It was a process that pitted neighbour against neighbour, parent against child. It meant leaving an island of self-sufficiency where people were hunters, gatherers, growers and fishers, to places which meant reliance on a cash economy. The next Placentia Bay communities are Boat Harbour with it's splendid waterfall, Brookside and Petite Forte which was only connected recently to the Heritage Run by road in 1992 giving access to the South East Bight/Little Paradise ferry.  Petite Forte, a hidden gem, was a substantial fishing community that escaped provincial resettlement policies of the 1960s. Visitors can take advantage of the pristine seclusion, hike to Great Paradise, whale watch or take a boat tour to Clattice Harbour or Darby's Harbour. Next turn-off is to the colourful and friendly settlement of Parker's Cove. Back on route 210, the Placentia West Development Association Economuseum, Tea Rose and Paddle Heritage House is the perfect midpoint reststop. "Uprooted" Interpretive Viewpark is located on the same site a few meters across from the Baine Harbour intersection. From there it's a short trip to the scenic community of Rushoon. Back on route 210, the next turn-off is to the fishing community of Red Harbour. There is whale watching at Red Harbour Head and salmon angling in Red Harbour East and West Rivers. Scenic Jean de Baie, Spanish Room, Rock Harbour and Mooring Cove are the remaining coastal communities on Mariner Drive. Stop at "From Dories to Drill Rigs" Interpretive Viewpark on Mortier Bay Lookout site on route 210. Mortier Bay is one of the largest ice free harbours in eastern North America (2300 m x  250 m). Deep sheltered waters, close proximity to fishing grounds and a ready supply of timber attracted shipbuilders for more than 400 years. The creation of Marystown Shipyard in 1966 ushered in the era of steel vessel construction. It and the Cow Head facility are among the best equipped and most efficient deep water facilities of their size in North America.  Marystown is the commercial centre for the region and home of a state of the art Recreational Facility, the Visitor Information Centre across from WalMart, St. Gabrial's Hall and Marystown Heritage Museum. Travellers have a choice of how they wish to experience the rest of "The Boot":  A short drive south to the picturesque Captain Cook Drive or a short drive north to French Island Drive.
Newfoundland & Labrador’s Burin Peninsula
Mariner Drive The Gateway to the Heritage Run is Mariner Drive on route 210 next to Goobies Visitor Information centre at the intersection of the Trans Canada Highway. Marina Drive leads you south through the Burin Peninsula over the middle of panoramic Southeastern Barrens between Fortune and Placentia Bays. Barrens now cover much of this glacier shaped landscape which years ago was forested. Repeated wild fires, over-cutting, thin soil and strong winds discouraged reforestation. A new mix of life appeared. Carpets of heath moss mixed with lichens and low growing shrubs, blueberries, partridgeberries, crowberries, bakeapples, orchids and insect eating plants called pitcher plants cover the landscape. Wildlife such as migrating woodland caribou, ptarmigan, eagles, osprey, Canada Geese and in more recent years moose, all rely on the barrens for their food supply. Around you are giant strewn about boulders, called erratics, that were left behind by melting glaciers more than 10,000 years ago. Pleasant settlements of North Harbour and Garden Cove are short drives northwest of Placentia Bay.  Swift Current and Piper's Hole River area, are perennial favorites for anglers and vacationers. Climb Bear's Folly or hike the old railway line. If the breeze is right, you might hear the sound of the French Army Piper's ghost, his spirit playing to the wind. Another Placentia Bay side route takes you to the quiet communities of Davis Cove and Monkstown.  The Paradise River flows to the sea at the long, narrow inlet of Paradise Sound. The difficult to access hydroelectric dam is one of only three arched dams in North America. "Feeling Erratic" Interpretive Viewpark is a rest stop 50 kms further on route 210, near Sandy Harbour River. Route 211, on the rugged Fortune Bay side, leads to the fishing communities of Terrenceville, Grand Le Pierre and English Harbour East. In May and June, the Middle Ridge Caribou herd passes nearby on their migration south. The rugged hills stand in sharp contrast to the barrens, with scenic waterfalls and imposing views. Bald eagles are often sighted in these parts. Returning to route 210 and then off onto Route 212 leads you to other quaint Fortune Bay communities. The road to Jacques Fontaine winds throughout wooded mountains by a long pond that follows the road. St. Bernard's was once known as Fox Cove. Bay L'Argent is a port of call to the last remaining Fortune Bay coastal boat, traveling to Rencontre East and Pool's Cove. The same route continues to the fishing communities of Little Bay East, Little Harbour East and dramatic scenery of Harbour Mille. The Ragged Point Lighthouse at Little Bay East is a challenging walk. You can easily stroll to the sea stack at Little Harbour Beach. Placentia Bay is home to numerous islands, nearly 365 in total, many once settled. Newfoundland resettlement represents one of the largest government sponsored population movements in Canadian history. Between 1954 and 1975 more than 300 settlements were abandoned with nearly 30,000 people relocated. It was a process that pitted neighbour against neighbour, parent against child. It meant leaving an island of self-sufficiency where people were hunters, gatherers, growers and fishers, to places which meant reliance on a cash economy. The next Placentia Bay communities are Boat Harbour with it's splendid waterfall, Brookside and Petite Forte which was only connected recently to the Heritage Run by road in 1992 giving access to the South East Bight/Little Paradise ferry.  Petite Forte, a hidden gem, was a substantial fishing community that escaped provincial resettlement policies of the 1960s. Visitors can take advantage of the pristine seclusion, hike to Great Paradise, whale watch or take a boat tour to Clattice Harbour or Darby's Harbour. Next turn-off is to the colourful and friendly settlement of Parker's Cove. Back on route 210, the Placentia West Development Association Economuseum, Tea Rose and Paddle Heritage House is the perfect midpoint reststop. "Uprooted" Interpretive Viewpark is located on the same site a few meters across from the Baine Harbour intersection. From there it's a short trip to the scenic community of Rushoon. Back on route 210, the next turn-off is to the fishing community of Red Harbour. There is whale watching at Red Harbour Head and salmon angling in Red Harbour East and West Rivers. Scenic Jean de Baie, Spanish Room, Rock Harbour and Mooring Cove are the remaining coastal communities on Mariner Drive. Stop at "From Dories to Drill Rigs" Interpretive Viewpark on Mortier Bay Lookout site on route 210. Mortier Bay is one of the largest ice free harbours in eastern North America (2300 m x  250 m). Deep sheltered waters, close proximity to fishing grounds and a ready supply of timber attracted shipbuilders for more than 400 years. The creation of Marystown Shipyard in 1966 ushered in the era of steel vessel construction. It and the Cow Head facility are among the best equipped and most efficient deep water facilities of their size in North America.  Marystown is the commercial centre for the region and home of a state of the art Recreational Facility, the Visitor Information Centre across from WalMart, St. Gabrial's Hall and Marystown Heritage Museum. Travellers have a choice of how they wish to experience the rest of "The Boot":  A short drive south to the picturesque Captain Cook Drive or a short drive north to French Island Drive.
©2016 Heritage Run Tourism Association · All Rights Reserved