The Heritage Run Tourism Association P.O. Box 757 · Marystown, NL Canada · A0E 2M0 Tel: 709) 279-1887 ·Fax: (709) 279-5116 Email:theheritagerun@nf.aibn.com 
Newfoundland & Labrador’s Burin Peninsula
Come Down and Stay a Spell Friendly folks, character-shaped by the 15th century European fishery, a rugged carved land and a dynamic sea, will welcome you with warmth and hospitality. Quaint fishing villages, many formerly isolated from any road system, like Petite Forte and English Harbour East, will charm you. Place names such as Beau Bois and Jacques Fontaine have a local English spin "Bo Boys" and Jack's Fountain!"  First settlers came because of the sea filled with “fish”, the common name for the Atlantic Cod. The famous Grand Banks fishing ground was the world's "bread & butter" for centuries.  Folks still make their living from the sea, but also engage in an expanding economy resulting from both the offshore oil, inshore fabrication and the Alberta oil industry. Our wild and rocky coastline stretches to both Placentia and Fortune Bays around a peninsula that is 161 kms long and 40 kms wide. Four distinct drives encompass the “boot”: Mariner Drive which begins at the Trans Canada Highway traveling southwest on route 210 to Marystown; Captain Cook Drive, covering the "heel" of the "boot", on routes 220, 221, 222 to Epworth; Captain Clarke Drive, southwest from Little St. Lawrence to Point May; and French Islands Drive, completing "the loop" around the "toe" of the Burin Peninsula, and back across the "ankle". There are scenic rest stops called Viewparks  where you can relax and read local stories on interpretive kiosks. These lead you to attractions in nearby communities. Along the more southern Placentia Bay coast there are more pull off areas that tell personal accounts of the 1929 Tsunami. All these are beautifully written and bilingual. Stay longer and enjoy Heritage Run attractions. Natural, cultural and heritage settings all relay individual themes. Breathe our fresh air in outdoor experiences. Walk, hike, and use motorized trails throughout the peninsula. Beaches are easily accessed from many communities. Ferries run from the peninsula to Rencontre East and Pool's Cove, South East Bight and St. Pierre & Miquelon. Take a guided tour to an ecological reserve. Watch or play sports that include soccer, a 9-hole golf course in a beautiful seaside setting or a state of the art recreational facility. Fishing and hunting enthusiasts love it here. Artisans and photographers find this place inspiring. Folks here have a strong traditional music, dance and theatric roots as can be heard at festivals and events. Taste delicious homecooked Newfoundland dishes at cafés, tea rooms and on some restaurant menus. "Some good!" Perhaps the best entertainment is talking with locals: on the wharf, at the mall, at a night club or grocery store. Locals love to "yarn". THE FRENCH CONNECTION Fancy a trip to France on your visit to the Heritage Run? The scenic French Islands of St. Pierre et Miquelon are the last colonies of France in North America, just a 19 km (12 miles) ferry ride with daily crossings from Fortune. Experience fine wine and French cuisine where rhythms of European culture, complete with afternoon siestas, continue to be a normal way of life. "C'est Bon!"
©2016 Heritage Run Tourism Association · All Rights Reserved
Newfoundland & Labrador’s Burin Peninsula
Come Down and Stay a Spell Friendly folks, character-shaped by the 15th century European fishery, a rugged carved land and a dynamic sea, will welcome you with warmth and hospitality. Quaint fishing villages, many formerly isolated from any road system, like Petite Forte and English Harbour East, will charm you. Place names such as Beau Bois and Jacques Fontaine have a local English spin "Bo Boys" and Jack's Fountain!"  First settlers came because of the sea filled with “fish”, the common name for the Atlantic Cod. The famous Grand Banks fishing ground was the world's "bread & butter" for centuries.  Folks still make their living from the sea, but also engage in an expanding economy resulting from both the offshore oil, inshore fabrication and the Alberta oil industry. Our wild and rocky coastline stretches to both Placentia and Fortune Bays around a peninsula that is 161 kms long and 40 kms wide. Four distinct drives encompass the “boot”: Mariner Drive which begins at the Trans Canada Highway traveling southwest on route 210 to Marystown; Captain Cook Drive, covering the "heel" of the "boot", on routes 220, 221, 222 to Epworth; Captain Clarke Drive, southwest from Little St. Lawrence to Point May; and French Islands Drive, completing "the loop" around the "toe" of the Burin Peninsula, and back across the "ankle". There are scenic rest stops called Viewparks  where you can relax and read local stories on interpretive kiosks. These lead you to attractions in nearby communities. Along the more southern Placentia Bay coast there are more pull off areas that tell personal accounts of the 1929 Tsunami. All these are beautifully written and bilingual. Stay longer and enjoy Heritage Run attractions. Natural, cultural and heritage settings all relay individual themes. Breathe our fresh air in outdoor experiences. Walk, hike, and use motorized trails throughout the peninsula. Beaches are easily accessed from many communities. Ferries run from the peninsula to Rencontre East and Pool's Cove, South East Bight and St. Pierre & Miquelon. Take a guided tour to an ecological reserve. Watch or play sports that include soccer, a 9-hole golf course in a beautiful seaside setting or a state of the art recreational facility. Fishing and hunting enthusiasts love it here. Artisans and photographers find this place inspiring. Folks here have a strong traditional music, dance and theatric roots as can be heard at festivals and events. Taste delicious homecooked Newfoundland dishes at cafés, tea rooms and on some restaurant menus. "Some good!" Perhaps the best entertainment is talking with locals: on the wharf, at the mall, at a night club or grocery store. Locals love to "yarn". THE FRENCH CONNECTION Fancy a trip to France on your visit to the Heritage Run? The scenic French Islands of St. Pierre et Miquelon are the last colonies of France in North America, just a 19 km (12 miles) ferry ride with daily crossings from Fortune. Experience fine wine and French cuisine where rhythms of European culture, complete with afternoon siestas, continue to be a normal way of life. "C'est Bon!"
©2016 Heritage Run Tourism Association · All Rights Reserved